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Why women are not as good as men at getting cancer treatments

September 13, 2021 Comments Off on Why women are not as good as men at getting cancer treatments By admin

New Scientist article Doctors in England and Wales have said that a new study shows that the gap between male and female doctors is closing, with the gap now about 1.5 per cent.

This compares with a peak of 2 per cent in 2006.

The report, published today, is based on data from a study that compared medical graduates with graduates from other specialities.

The study, published by the Medical Research Council (MRC), said the gap had fallen from a peak level of 5.6 per cent to about 1 per cent, with graduates in the most important specialities getting around half as many treatments.

But Dr Jane Taylor, the lead author of the study, said that was still a long way from the levels that would lead to the elimination of gender bias.

“When we do a systematic review of the medical profession, we are always looking at a small number of studies and we are looking at data that is coming out of one part of the profession. “

“And so the gap is not closing. “

“It is growing, but we are still working hard to close it.” “

In 2012, about one in five of the people who received a cancer treatment in England, Wales or Scotland had a male doctor. “

It is growing, but we are still working hard to close it.”

In 2012, about one in five of the people who received a cancer treatment in England, Wales or Scotland had a male doctor.

In 2013, it was one in six.

In 2015, the figure was three in 10.

Dr Emma Thompson, from the MRC’s cancer research division, said the new study showed that the gender gap in cancer treatments was growing.

She said that despite the rise in the number of cancer treatments being carried out, the percentage of treatments that went to women was still low, at about 50 per cent for all treatments. “

In the last few years, the gap has risen to about 2 per 100 women.”

She said that despite the rise in the number of cancer treatments being carried out, the percentage of treatments that went to women was still low, at about 50 per cent for all treatments.

She added: “The gender gap is now around 2.5 percent, and we need to get closer to getting to zero.”

Dr Taylor said the study had highlighted that the number and proportion of women who received cancer treatment increased from one in seven in 2006 to one in four today.

The MRC study found that the majority of cancer patients who were treated in the year following their diagnosis received about half their treatment from the first week, with about half receiving their second and third week treatments.

The majority of men and those in their 50s received at least half of their treatment.

The new study also found that women tended to have higher rates of recurrence in the two years following diagnosis than men.

Dr Thompson said: [Women] are far more likely to have recurrence.

She added that the findings of the MSC study were “a bit surprising” given the previous research. “

They tend to do the first follow-up after diagnosis.”

She added that the findings of the MSC study were “a bit surprising” given the previous research.

The research is published in the journal Cancer Care.

Dr Thomas Clements, the head of research at the British Association for Cancer Research, said women were being “over-represented” in cancer treatment.

He said: There is no doubt that there are huge barriers to women getting cancer treatment, including barriers that include the fact that they are less likely to be treated with specialist cancer treatments, they are more likely not to have a family history of cancer, they may have a lower life expectancy, they do not have the best genes, and the majority are female.

Dr Clements said the MSc study would be of interest to all medical schools, including those in the UK, as it could shed light on what barriers might exist in women being admitted to medical school.

He added: The MSc research shows that, despite the high rates of diagnosis and treatment of women, it is still much too early to be seeing a marked decrease in the proportion of male and male patients getting cancer.

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